Tree Service Pros of McKinney will tell you that trees are some of the best choices of things to grow in your landscape. They provide shade, moisture retention, and food for your compost every fall. Trees also add a great deal to your property values, more than any other plant you can put in your yard.

Selecting a climbing plant. Climbing plants are usually container-grown, although occasionally they are sold as bare-root plants. Choose a healthy looking plant with a good framework of both established stems and new shoots. Turn the pot over, and check to see if there are any young roots growing out of the holes in the bottom. If so, this means that the plant is well-rooted. Reject any plant that is potbound (meaning you can’t easily remove it from the pot).

Vegetable oil can keep your trimmer running smoothly. If you find yourself stopping frequently to deal with trimmer line jams and breaks, get some cooking spray or vegetable oil out the next time you need to refill. Spray the trimmer line thoroughly before installing, and it will feed smoothly without breaking.

Divide up your perennials while they still look healthy. It’s best to divide a perennial at the end of the growing season during which it hits its peak. As the plant starts to overgrow, the center of the plant will start to have dying stalks and weaker flowers. Allowing perennials to grow too long may also lead to them overtaking neighboring plants.

Make a do it yourself twine holder by grabbing a rolled up length of twine and putting it into a small clay pot. Pull a small portion of the twine out the drainage hole and flip the pot upside down. You will always know where your twine is instead of digging around for it in a toolbox or shed.

If you have many potted plants, do not water them all the same way. Some plants do well with plenty of water, whereas other plants might prefer a drier soil. Over-watering can do as much damage to a plant as under-watering. So, be mindful of what types of plants that you have in the pots, and water them appropriately.

Try “boiling” weeds to get rid of them. Boiling water in a pot is a safe “herbicide.” Pour hot water right on the weeds, but do not get any on your plants. Boiling water kills weeds by destroying their roots. Weeds won’t be able to survive, never mind grow, with damaged weeds.

Tie strips of mylar balloons to the branches of your fruit trees just before harvest time. These flapping, shiny straps will frighten away birds and small mammals, protecting your fruit. Just be sure to remove them after the harvest, because if they blow loose, animals may eat them and become ill.

If you’re planting crops that need an abundant amount of sunshine, then plant miniature gardens wherever the sun shines most. If you have plants that need more than six hours of sunlight, group them together in small plots throughout your yard. If your patio or deck receives the most amount of sunshine, plant your crops in appropriately sized containers and place them in the brightest spot you can find.

When you buy young bare-root trees, keep the root ball moist until your are ready to plant. If the roots dry out, the tree will weaken or die. You should plant the tree as soon as you bring it home. If you cannot, lay the tree on its side and cover the roots with moist peat moss, then cover the roots with a tarp.

Don’t plant large shade trees in your yard between the curb and the sidewalk. Large trees have powerful root systems. These roots will crawl under the sidewalk, lifting and breaking the sidewalk pavers. The sidewalk can’t be repaired properly without removing the tree roots, which would damage the tree. Smaller ornamental trees will do less damage.

The best time to plant deciduous trees are in the summer and fall. The best way to tell if it is a good time to plant these trees, is to look at the new growth and notice if has hardened. It is best to plant the trees before the ground freezes to reduce transplant shock.

Choose a site for fruit trees depending on their specific requirements. Most fruit trees require 8 hours of sun per day. Morning sun is important, as it dries dew rapidly, helping to prevent fungus. Avoid planting fruit trees in a low spot in the garden where frost or cold air can collect. Some fruit trees are especially susceptible to late frost damage, and are better planted on a north-facing slope. This is especially true for peach, plum, cherry and apricot trees.

It’s all about the mulch. try mulching all of your flower beds and trees with at least 3″ of the organic material. It will conserve water, add some humus and other nutrients, and it will also discourage weed growth. It will also give the beds a nicer, more finished appearance.

Mulch your garden with no less than 3″ of organic bedding material. This method will save you money by conserving water and is good for the environment, too. You’ll discover it could also look really good.

Grow shade-loving annuals. Most annuals (and tender perennials) thrive in full sun, but some prefer a little shade. They do well on the north side of a house, or under the canopy of trees and shrubs. Remember to provide good soil and plenty of moisture. For constant bloom in a shady area, plant impatiens, balsam, clarkia and lobelia. Nicotiana is particularly striking, growing 5 feet tall, and producing beautiful tubular white flowers with a glorious fragrance.

Whether you like planting flowers so your home looks more beautiful, or vegetables because you’d like to save money and eat healthier, gardening is fun for many people. You can enjoy your own produce without worrying about pesticides, and grow your favorite flowers as well. Remember these tips if you want to start a garden.